The weirdest museums in the world

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People travel for all kinds of reasons. Some just need a relaxing vacation so they choose an exotic destination, others consider themselves foodies so they literally travel for the food while some travelers just want to absorb the culture. Usually, these people will check ahead of time which are the most popular museums they can pay a visit to, or which museums have the activities that fit their needs best.

When you think of people visiting a museum, the first picture that pops in your mind is usually of them going to an art or history museum. These are the mainstream ones where the line is long and the cost is usually high. However, for some people, culture means something else. It’s not about another art exhibition or a science showcase, it’s about finding those niche attractions, that nobody has heard of. These sightseeings usually don’t have a long line, but they do have a different flair to them. You’ll be surprised to find out that there are more odd museums out there than you can imagine. These kinds of museums might not educate you about the ‘important’ things in life, but they will give you the opportunity to experience the place you are traveling to in a whole new way. These museums will make you appreciate a different kind of culture. We’ve rounded up the weirdest, most bizarre yet interesting museums from around the world:


Museum of Broken Relationships, Zagreb, Croatia

Can you imagine there is one place that  holds all the broken hearts in the world? Well, there is apparently, almost. This special museum has actually evolved from having two branches (one in Croatia and one in L.A.) to a ‘traveling exhibition’. Inside you’ll be able to find all kinds of artifacts and different works donated from people who had their heart broken or just had a really really bad relationship. The museum encourages people to donate their broken relationship’s artifacts in an attempt to help them overcome ‘an emotional collapse.’ Some of the things you will find are rings, old pieces of clothing and some of the strangest objects you can think of.

Dog collar museum, Kent, England

Love dogs? Love collars? Great! This museum is the perfect one for you. The Dog Collar Museum located in Kent, England showcases a collection of collars dating back from the 15th century when they had different kinds of uses. You’ll be surprised to find out that there are more than 500,000 visitors visiting each year. Surprisingly enough, no dogs are allowed inside. The Leeds Castle Dog Collar Museum is the perfect place for those pooch enthusiasts.

Sulabh International Toilet Museum, New Delhi, India

When you first think about a toilet museum, you may assume that it is nothing but disgusting. However, this toilet museum actually has a very clear message: it calls for improvements in everything that has to do with sanitation in third world countries. Apart from the social agenda, if you’ve ever wondered about how toilets have evolved throughout the years, then that’s the place for you. Or if you just want to take a break from your regular sightseeing, literally.

The Mini Bottle Gallery, Oslo, Norway

Remember those tiny little bottles we used to receive on the plane and they were so special that we would take them home? Well, apparently there’s an entire place for people who have these tiny fetishes. Inside, you will find tiny bottles that are filled with everything you can imagine. There are over 53,000 tiny bottles in this 3-story museum.

Avanos Hair Museum, Avanos, Turkey

Warning: this is probably the creepiest thing you’ll ever see. And we thought the toilet museum was weird. It’s not enough that there’s an entire museum dedicated to hair, but it has to be underground to add to that creepiness. Chez Galip, the owner of this place started his collection over 30 years ago when the woman he was in love with left him and he asked her to leave him a lock of her hair. More than 16,000 women have left pieces of their hair and we just feel this museum could join the museum of Broken Relationships for an unusual exhibition.

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